Agile Audio Dashboards – Want Voice with That

VoiceThatThis podcast is an interview with Jeff “Ski” Kinsey (@Consultski on Twitter) from Agile Audio Dashboards. This episode hit the airwaves as well on News-Talk 1480 WHBC located in Canton, Ohio during September 2018.

Jeff, along with his partner Tom Montelione, produce custom Alexa Skills. This podcast talks not only about Alexa but in addition the importance of “voice” regarding the future of online marketing and our interaction with technology.

We also cover aspects of podcasting including its integration with Alexa devices and the role of audio in general as it is related to digital marketing.

If you enjoy technology it’s all the better but this is an interesting program across the board for anyone who may be interested in what the future may be for how we interact with the internet.

Ask your Alexa device: “Alexa, enable Audio Dash Updates” to hear more from “SKI”

This is an audio snippet of the podcast:

For your convenience the full audio interview is available in this post below. It is also available on most of the popular podcasting platforms including iHeartRadio.

Also below is a video snippet of a separate live WHBC broadcast hosted by Pam Cook about Agile Audio Dashboards. In it both of us talk a little bit about voice and each of our individual backgrounds.

“Want Voice With That” by Agile Audio Dashboards (Pilot Episode)

 

 

HumorOutcasts Radio Interview with Dorothy Rosby

Rosby Cover HO
HumorOutcasts Press (Publisher)

This podcast is an interview with Dorothy Rosby. Dorothy is the author of I Used to Think I Was Not that Bad and Then I Got to Know Me Better,” who refers to the book as the book for people who read self-improvement books and never get any better. She also is the author of I Didn’t Know You Could Make Birthday Cake from Scratch, Parenting Blunders from Cradle to Empty Nest.” 

Dorothy Rosby is a speaker and syndicated humor columnist whose writing appears in publications across eleven states. Her column has been recognized by the South Dakota Newspaper Association. She was a finalist in the 2015 Robert Benchley Annual Award for Humor Writing and was the 2015 first-place winner in the Humor Column category of the National Federation of Press Women contest.

Dorothy Rosby and Billy Dees
Dorothy Rosby and Billy Dees

During this interview with Dorothy we cover a gamut of topics including her method of topic selection, the discipline of writing, and interestingly how she feels humor can be a method of persuasion.

You can follow Dorothy along with her amusing witticisms on Twitter at @DorothyRosby.

The podcast interview is available below at the bottom of this post. For your convenience the interview is also available on most of the major podcasting platforms including iTunes Apple Podcasts and Stitcher under “Billy Dees.” It can also be accessed on TuneIn and iHeartRadio through your Amazon Alexa streaming device.

The episode is titled on these services as:

HumorOutcasts Radio Interview with Dorothy Rosby

 

Be sure to visit HumorOutcasts.com.

Canton Ohio Network Alliance

The LinkedIn group, the Canton Ohio Network Alliance (CONA), holds informal gatherings the second Tuesday of each month. The meetings are held at the Canton Courtyard Marriott from 6-8 pm.

There is no charge to attend the meetings or fees to join the group, however, guests are responsible for their own food and beverages.

As with the best intentions of social media, the meetings are designed to be an opportunity to meet other business people in a relaxed and friendly environment. There are no expectations for members to make presentations or to wield a dynamic personality. In fact, hard sells are not encouraged. The get-together is intended to give members an opportunity to introduce themselves to other area professionals, interact with each other and learn about everyone’s businesses and related skills, and hopefully form associations that will lead to networking and new ideas. By all means bring plenty of business cards and any other related handout information. Everyone is encouraged to invite their friends and associates to come along as well.

Please be sure to follow updates for any weather related cancellations or other modifications to our group’s activity. You can follow and join CONA on LinkedIn here: Canton Ohio Network Alliance.

Is the Customer Always Right?

Closeup portrait of angry grumpy middle-aged man looking from unIn a word. No.

I do believe that customers are entitled to every effort and beyond to ensure that their investment in a given purchase is honored diligently by those selling the goods and services. There have been times when I have fallen on the sword at a loss to make sure that a customer who came to me in good faith was not disappointed. This is the right thing to do and at times is a cost of doing business overall. Customers must get what they paid for and it should come with a certain graciousness from the merchant. After all, customers are the reason our businesses exist.

Additionally, there are times when it is simply more practical to appease an unhappy camper than it is to spend too much time dealing with the situation.

However, there is an old adage in the consumer market place for the “buyer to beware,” and at the same time I would suggest that this applies to the seller as well.

The rules of the free market apply equally to both sides of the business counter. Yes, customers have the right to take their business elsewhere if you cannot satisfy their needs. At the same time, a private purveyor of goods and services is under no obligation to match unreasonable prices or agree to high demands as part of a sale.

There are customers masquerading under such seemingly innocuous terms such as “value seekers” and “deal getters” who more accurately are malcontents who will suck the blood right out of your business. They destroy the morale of your staff and steal your company’s resources from your otherwise loyal and repeat customers.

This may sound like sacrilege to the business-seminar loving, latte sipping, customer management gurus out there; but the truth is that some customers are just not worth having.

This is especially true for retailers who are often asked to match prices from various sources on the internet.

“I can get it for less on the internet but I’d really rather deal with someone local like you,” are not words coming from someone who is trying to do you a favor.

The translation of, “I’d rather deal with you…” is:

“I want to ask fifty million questions about the product to a trained sales staff, I want to demo the product in a brick and mortar store, and I want to be able to return the product to a reputable and known establishment if it doesn’t work. However, I still want the same cheap internet price.”

One way of heading off this type of situation is to decide what kind of business you intend to be.

I get criticized for saying this but I have often maintained that you can gear your company to be a price leader or to offer customized service and support; but you cannot do both. There may be a few exceptions for large companies that can split their brand identities and there are times when we have to be flexible, however, as a general rule I do not subscribe to the notion that all business is good business.

To be a price leader you need to move volume quickly and that is hard to do when you are also offering service and support. By the same token, if you are set up for customized service and support, price shoppers devour your time trying to negotiate deals over flaky projects that you should not want to be representative of your company’s services from the start.

When it comes right down to it business relationships are very similar to friendships or love interests. The best relationships are two-way streets. Do exceptionally right by your customers and expect fair compensation and respect in return. Stand up for who you are and don’t get bullied into serving some abstract ideal about pleasing customers if it ultimately comes at a loss for you.

How to Tell a Customer That Things Are Going Less Than Perfect

Angry woman talking on phoneNo matter how hard all of us strive to provide good service to our clients, sooner or later something will go wrong. Parts will be back-ordered. The software will have changed. The stars just will not line-up the way that you expected for a particular project. How you handle this dilemma will define you and your business as much as anything else you do.

Here’s the key ingredient to managing this type of incident. Make the call.

The psychology of this is very simple. When you call the customer you are in control of the conversation. When you wait for the inevitable call to come in, the customer is in control.

For example, let’s say you ordered a product for John and told him that it should be in the following week. The item then came up as back-ordered. So, you called the customer and said this:

John, hi – I just want to give you an update on the product you ordered. The product is currently back-ordered. We checked several other suppliers but it seems as though the manufacturer unexpectedly got behind on demand. If you would like to keep the order in place we will monitor the situation for you and call you as soon as it becomes available.

Now, will the customer be necessarily thrilled with this kind of news? Probably not, but most people are reasonable and will appreciate the fact that you were aware of the issue and contacted them. This is especially true if the customer paid in advance.

By contrast, let’s suppose that you did nothing in this same situation and the customer called in and said this:

Look, I was in there three weeks ago and paid for my item. I was told it should arrive within a week. I haven’t heard anything. I’m not sure if you forgot about my order or what you are doing. Is the item in? I would really like to know what is going on.

The best thing that you can do in response is damage control. You could explain to the customer that the item is back-ordered but the frustration with the circumstances has already broken the brand that is you.

In both of these scenarios the news that you are giving to the customer is exactly the same. The item was back-ordered. The difference is in what set of circumstances the message was delivered.

Nobody likes to be the bearer of bad news. However, you can give unpleasant news to a customer in a way that denotes respect toward them and concern for their satisfaction if you make the contact first.

If you wait for them to contact you it’s over. From their perspective you just didn’t give a damn. And to be totally honest, you probably didn’t.